Who vs. Whom

Who
Whom

Who and Whom are often confused. One way to resolve the confusion on using who vs. whom is to remember that who is always used for the subject and whom for the object.

In particular, there are two scenarios that lead to a confusion between who and whom: when introducing a question, and when introducing a dependent clause.

Comparison chart

Edit this comparison chart

Who

Whom

Part of Speech "Who" is always the subject. "Whom" is always the object.
Example Who are you? Whom are you with?

Contents: Who vs Whom

edit Who vs Whom when introducing a question

The rule that who should be used for the subject and whom for the object also extends to scenarios when the word is being used in a question. When the answer to the question begins with a subjective pronoun or noun, use who. For example, Who was the journalist who threw a shoe at George Bush? (The answer would be Muntadar al-Zeidi was the Iraqi journalist who threw a shoe at him. In the answer, Muntadar al-Zeidi is the subject so the usage of who is correct.)

On the other hand, if the answer is an objective pronoun (or noun), use whom. For example, Whom did you support in the presidential election? (The answer would be I supported Ron Paul. In the answer, Ron Paul is the object and so the usage of whom is correct.)

edit Who vs whom when introducing a dependent clause

The rule that who should be used for the subject and whom for the object also extends to scenarios when the word is being used to introduce a dependent clause. When the pronoun is the subject of the dependent clause being introduced, use who. When the pronoun is the object, use whom. For example,

edit More Examples

edit Video explaining the differences

Share this comparison:

If you read this far, you should follow us on:

"Who vs Whom." Diffen.com. Diffen LLC, n.d. Web. 22 Sep 2014. < http://www.diffen.com/difference/Who_vs_Whom >

Comments: Who vs Whom

Stay informed Related Comparisons
Follow Diffen
Make Diffen Smarter.

Log in to edit comparisons or create new comparisons in your area of expertise!

Sign up »
Top 5 Comparisons Recently Compared

share

Up next

Lay vs. Lie