John McCain and Barack Obama were nominees for the 2008 United States Presidential election from the Republican and Democratic party respectively. Barack Obama won the 2008 Presidential election.

Comparison chart

Barack Obama versus John McCain comparison chart
Barack ObamaJohn McCain
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Barack ObamaJohn McCain
Political Party Democratic Republican
Alma Mater Occidental College, Columbia University (BA), Harvard Law School (JD) United States Naval Academy
Position on the Economy Repeal Bush tax cuts for households earning more than $250,000. Lower taxes on manufacturing industry. Stimulus spending and tax cuts to grow the economy (short term). Cut spending and raise taxes on wealthy to reduce deficit (long term). Make the Bush tax cuts permanent; eliminate alternative minimum tax. Recently called for steps to reduce the price of gas in summer 2008.
Position on Healthcare Signed the 2010 healthcare overhaul bill. Calls for patient protections like allowing coverage for pre-existing conditions, not letting insurers cancel policies when patients get sick, and requiring individuals to buy health insurance or pay a fine. For free-market, consumer-based system; has pledged affordable health care for every American without a mandate; says universal health care is possible without a tax increase.
Position on Immigration Supports path to legalization for illegal immigrants that includes learning English & paying fines; toughen penalties for hiring illegal immigrants; voted for fence along Mexican border. Issued exec order to not deport certain undocumented immigrants Supports a path to legalization for illegal immigrants that includes learning English and paying fines; voted for fence along Mexican border.
Position on Iraq Opposed invasion from the beginning; opposed troop increase; ended military operations in Iraq(on previously negotiated Bush timeline). Made no effort to keep promise to exit in 2009. Troops moved to Afghanistan and Iranian border. Voted in 2002 to authorize invasion, still supportive; in favor of troop increase; against a timetable for troop withdrawal, but projected he would have most U.S. forces home by 2013.
Position on Iran Engage in direct diplomacy; tighten economic sanctions with international cooperation; military option not off the table. Failed to deliver on 2008 campaign promise to meet with the Iranian president without preconditions. Form an alliance with European countries to put economic and diplomatic pressure on Iran; no unconditional diplomacy; military option not off the table, but would consult with leaders of Congress.
Position on Abortion Supports Roe v. Wade; criticized Supreme Court decision that upheld ban on partial-birth abortions. Wants to overturn Roe v. Wade, but has been supportive in the past
Place of Birth Honolulu, Hawaii Coco Solo Naval Air Station, Panama Canal Zone
Religion Christian (United Church of Christ) Episcopalian (to 1990s); Baptist (by 2000s)
Running mate Joseph "Joe" Biden Sarah Palin
Date of birth August 4,1961 August 29, 1936
Books Authored Dreams from My Father: A story of Race and Inheritance; and The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts of Reclaiming the American Dream. Faith of My Fathers, Worth the Fighting For, Character is Destiny, Hard Call

Differences in Economic Policy

As a Republican, John McCain is generally in favor of lower taxes and cutting government spending. Obama's economic plan called for increasing government revenue by rescinding Bush's tax cuts on "wealthy" Americans and ending the war in Iraq.

Differences in Tax Policy

John McCain's economic plan called for extending the Bush Administration's tax cuts, eliminating the Alternative Minimum Tax, and slashing corporate taxes. He also called for a suspension of federal gas taxes from Memorial Day to Labor Day, plus a simpler tax code.

On the other hand, Barack Obama's plan called for repealing the tax cuts for people earning over $250,000 a year. His tax policy also called for a "Making Work Pay" tax credit (of up to $500 per person, or $1,000 per working family) and simplified tax filing for average Americans to save time and money in tax preparation.

According to analysis[1] by the Tax Policy Center (a joint venture between the Urban Institute and the Brookings Institution, two Washington think tanks), both plans differed in terms of impact of tax code on economic activity and distributional effects of tax cuts.

Differences in Trade Policy

John McCain believes that US needs to engage in international trade and is in favor of multilateral, regional and bilateral efforts to reduce barriers to trade, level the global playing field and build effective enforcement of global trading rules. His trade policy involves making the next generation of American workers more competetive by improving the quality of education as well as easy access to education for the children.

Barack Obama also supports international trade as it will strengthen the economy and create more jobs for the Americans. He intends to fight for a trade policy which opens up foreign markets and press for trade agreements which set labour and environmental standards throughout the world. His policy includes making amends in the NAFTA agreement so that its beneficial for workers. In order make the workers competetive, he intends to update the Trade Adjustment Assistance and provide retraining opportunities for the workers.

Differences in Mortgage Crisis Handling

To help those hurt by the housing crisis, John MacCain proposed a "Home Plan", that would provide robust, timely and targetted help to those hurt by the housing crisis. Under his HOME Plan, every homeowner would be given the opportunity to trade a mortgage for a manageable loan that reflects their home's market value. He also called for formation of a special task force by the Justice Department that would aggressively investigate potential criminal wrongdoing in the mortgage industry and bring to justice any who violated the law.

While Barack Obama also intends to come down heavily on the fradulent brokers and lenders, he proposes to make sure home buyers have honest and complete information about their mortgage options. He also intends to give tax credit to all middle-class home owners. These, he shall achieve by creating an universal mortgage credit, ensure more accountability in the sub-prime mortgage industry, mandate accurate loan disclosure, create a fund to help people refinance their mortgages and work to eliminate the provision that prevents bankruptcy courts from modifying an individual's mortgage payments.

McCain and Obama's reactions to the September 2008 Wall St crash

McCain blamed the SEC chairman for the Wall Street crash and called for his resignation. Before the $85 million AIG bailout, McCain said he was against bailing out AIG. However, after the bailout he said he was in agreement with the administration's course of action in order to protect AIG customers - insurance policy holders and annuity holders. McCain called for a commission to be set up to investigate the cause of the financial crisis and criticized Obama for not having a stand.

Obama called for tighter regulation of the financial markets and his campaign criticized McCain for flip flopping on the AIG bailout issue. Obama also criticized McCain for his remarks that "the fundamentals of the [American] economy are strong", and for being unable to answer a simple question - how many houses does he own? The Obama campaign has tried to project McCain as out of touch with the average American.

Obama vs. McCain Economic Stimulus proposals

John Maccain and Barack Obama, both agree on lowering the tax rates to provide a stimulus to the economy, however, while John McCain shall try to boost the economy by taking steps to increase the investment and make the industry more competitive, Barack Obama plans to revitalize the economy by providing spending power directly in the hands of the people. John McCain unveiled his plan to provide a stimulus to the economy in January 2008. As per the plan, McCain will lower the corporate tax rates, which shall lead to expanding the economy and hiking the workers's wages. He shall also allow expensing of equipment and technology investments, which would provide an immediate boost to the capital expenditure and thus boost the economy. McCain also plans to establish a permanent research and development tax credit, which shall provide an incentive to innovate and make the American economy more competitive.

Barack Obama plans to stimulate the economy include providing an immediate tax cut/bonus of $250 to the workers, senior citizens, lower and middle income workers. His plan also includes providing relief to home-owners hurt by the mortgage crisis, providing aid to states hardest hit by the crisis and also expanding and extending the Unemployment Insurance.

Differences in Foreign Policy

Differences on Iraq war stand

John McCain and Barack Obama hold drastically different views on the Iraq war.

Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002

When the United States Congress passed a resolution in the Senate authorizing the war in Iraq, McCain voted in favor of the war. At the time, Obama was not in the senate and did not vote on the resolution. Obama, however, publically opposed the war and made a major speech warning of “an occupation of undetermined length, with undetermined costs, and undetermined consequences.”

Withdrawl of Troops from Iraq

Obama is in favor of phased withdrawl of American troops from Iraq and an end to the war. Obama's Iraq plan calls for the withdrawl of American forces at the rate of 1 to 2 brigades a month, and completing the withdrawl in summer of 2010. However, Obama has plans to leave a small "residual force" behind in Iraq and the region for counter-terrorism purposes and to protect American interests. Obama has declared that under his administration the U.S. would not build permenant military bases in Iraq, but would help to build up the Iraqi military so that Iraqis could defend themselves and move toward a political reconciliation between the Iraqi Sunni and Shi'ite factions that have been the source of sectarian violence and unrest. Obama was originally against the so-called "troop surge" strategy of the Bush administration and has since stated that, while the surge has been sucessful in lowering violence in Iraq, it has still failed to bring about the ultimately political goals that are necessary to succesfully end the war. Obama sees the war in Iraq as a distraction from the War on Terrorism, which Obama sees as being centered largely around Afghanistan its border with Pakistan. Ending the war in Iraq, Obama argues, will help enable the U.S. to redeploy much needed forces to shore up Afghanistan, which has recently suffered a deteriorating security situation due to a re-envigorated Taliban insurgency. Ending the Iraq War will also free up billions of dollars from the budget, money that can be better spent at home and in the War on Terror, according to Obama. The end of the war will also help allow America to rebuild a military strained by years of messy warfare and to restore America's position in the world both morally and strategically.


McCain opposes the withdrawal of American troops from Iraq according to any imposed time table, as he sees such time tables as artificial and irresponsible. He has thus far declined to offer any timeline for withdrawl or an end to the war. McCain has said that he would leave American forces in Iraq longer than necessary, but only supports a withdrawal once Iraq is stable and terrorist elements in Iraq have been defeated. John McCain supported the "surge" and was one of its most visible proponents. He touts what he sees as the great success of the surge strategy as a signal of potential victory. Those gains would be lost in McCain's eyes if the U.S. were to leave too early according to a deadline established by Washington. McCain thus favors an indefinite continuation of the American presence in Iraq and offers no dates or schedules for when troops might be redeployed. He has argued that it is impossible to know how long it could take to finish the job in Iraq, and that the U.S. may need to continue a large presence in Iraq well into the future. McCain sees Iraq as the central front in the War on Terrorism, and claims that America is perfectly capable of handling Iraq and Afghanistan at the same time, while also being able to handle any other crises that may arise. McCain has repeatedly claimed that a withdrawl from Iraq would be seen as a defeat in the eyes of the world and would embolden terrorists and America's enemies as a sign of American weakness and lack of resolve. According to McCain, the war in Iraq may be expensive and painful, but it is necessary.

Effect of War on Afganistan

While McCain has recommended an increased emphasis on developmental aid to Afganistan, he has not been specific about sending troops there. However, Obama wants to withdraw troops from Iraq partly to increase US presence in Afghanistan. Obama wants to shift other resources as well as focus from Iraq to Afghanistan, as he sees it as the central front in the War on Terrorism and specifically is concerned at the failure of the U.S. to stamp out residual elements of the Taliban which have recently been strengthening along the Afghan-Pakistani border region. Obama has also been highly critical with the failure of the current administration to capture or kill Osama Bin Laden, mastermind of the 9/11 attacks and leader of Al Qaeda, who is believed to have been taking refuge in the area since 2002. McCain sees Iraq as the critical front in the War on Terror, and does not see the two issues as separate. McCain has claimed to have a plan to capture or kill Osama Bin Laden but has not been specific in what new strategy or tactics he would employ.

Stabalizing Iraq

McCain believes that Iraq should use a part of its budgetary surplus for employing Iraqis in infrastructure projects and restoring basic services. He thinks that the international community and especially, Saudi Arabia, should invest in Iraq and promote entreprenuership through micro-finance schemes. This shall create jobs and improve the economy and thus create peace and propel growth.

Obama on the other hand thinks that USA has a moral and security responsibity towards the Iraqis who have become refugees and are displaced in their own country. He shall contribute at least $ 2 billion to address the crisis.

Differences on Iran

Threat from Iran

Barack Obama believes that the threat posed by Iran to the United States is tiny as compared to the threat once posed by the Soviet Union. However, John McCain feels that Iran is a major threat to the United States since it threatens Israel, a key U.S. ally.

Method of confronting the threat

Barack Obama believes that many non-military options are still left to be pursued to deal with Iran. He strongly recommends directly presidential diplomacy with Iran without preconditions. If that doesnt work, he recommends stepping up of economic pressure and political isolation for Iran. However, John McCain feels that Obama's willingness to meet with the Iranian president would only embolden extremists. In order to peacefully but decisively make Iran give up their nuclear program and support to terrorism, he suggests creating of real world pressures on Iran like severely limiting Iranian imports of gasoline, targeted sanctions such as denying visas and freezing assets, and calling on the international community to divest itself from Iran.

Different views on immigration

Both John McCain and Barack Obama hold very different views on the matters of Immigration. Both are worried about making the borders more secure in interest of national security and support the construction of a wall at the Southern border, but McCain opines from a broader perspective and says that the US need to build strong allies with Mexico and Latin America to help solve the immigration problems. Obama believes that the immigration bureaucracy needs to be improved.

However, the most significant difference of opinions lies in the fact that while both of the presidential candidates want the illegal immigrants to be assimilated into the mainstream society, by learning English etc. Obama is willing to give them an opppurtunity to become citizens after paying a fine. Also, he believes that illegal immigration may be reduced by removing the incentives to immigrate illegally.

McCain opposes giving driving licenses to illegal immigrants; Obama supports it. McCain has opposed the Dream Act that benefits undocumented students and Obama supports it.

Comparison of Healthcare policy

Both the presidential candidates aim at providing affordable healthcare for all Americans. However, John McCain's policy aims to achieve this by shifting from employer based insurance coverage to open market system, made possible by radically altering the tax treatment of healthcare benefits and making the private insurance market more affordable and competitive. On the other hand, Barack Obama intends to stick to an employer based system, but expand government involvement.

The top priority of John McCain's healthcare policy is to provide affordable healthcare for every American. However, he believes that every individual should have the freedom to choose their own healthcare and is an opponent of Barack Obama's policy which requires everyone to obtain health insurance. McCain intends to provide $2,500 tax credits for individuals and $5,000 for families to buy their own insurance but at the same time, he shall be ending the tax breaks received for employer provided health insurance. He believes, affordable and universal healthcare does not require increasing the taxes. However, under his plan, employers would not be able to deduct healthcare costs from their taxes. McCain plans to offer federal assistance for states to create pools for high-risk consumers.

Barack Obama aims for affordable and universal healthcare. His policy requires that all children have health insurance and require all employers to offer health insurance or pay a percentage of their payrolls into a federal fund to provide coverage. His proposal provides subsidies to individuals who cannot afford to purchase health insurance. To make healthcare affordable, Obama is relying mostly on the heavy hand of the government and will impose caps on health care premiums and price controls on drug companies. He would then have the government establish national practice standards for health providers and doctors. He plans to create The National Health Insurance Exchange, to make shopping easier for Americans.

Comparison of Environmental policy

John McCain and Barack Obama, both support a mandatory cap and trade system to reduce carbon emissions. However, there are some differences in the ways and means they plan to achieve this goal.

John McCain thinks that US should work towards a global effort that would include developing countries and become a part of the Kyoto Treaty to join other nations in trying to reduce the greenhouse gases. His proposals include advocating a global effort to reduce greenhouse gases, limiting carbon emissions by harnessing market forces that will bring advanced technologies, such as nuclear energy, to the market faster and reducing dependence on foreign suppliers of energy.

Barack Obama recognizes and accepts the fact that, being the world's largest producer of greenhouse gases, America has the responsibility to lead the efforts on reducing carbon emissions and greenhouse gases. He intends to enact a cap-and-trade system that will dramatically reduce carbon emissions in the US, before leading global efforts in doing the same. He has proposed that all transportation fuels in the United States should emit 5 percent less carbon by 2015 and 10 percent less carbon by 2020.

Comparison of Energy Policy

While both presidential candidates emphasize the need for the United States to achieve “energy security” while also slowing down the carbon emissions that are believed to contribute to global warming, they offer sharply different visions of the role that ethanol, which can be made from a variety of organic materials, should play in those efforts.

Mr. McCain advocates eliminating the multibillion-dollar annual government subsidies that domestic ethanol has long enjoyed. As a free trade advocate, he also opposes the 54-cent-a-gallon tariff that the United States slaps on imports of ethanol made from sugar cane, which packs more of an energy punch than corn-based ethanol and is cheaper to produce.

Mr. Obama, in contrast, favors the subsidies, some of which end up in the hands of the same oil companies he says should be subjected to a windfall profits tax. In the name of helping the United States build "energy independence", he also supports the tariff, which some economists say may well be illegal under the World Trade Organization’s rules but which his advisers say is not.

Views on Education

John McCain's approach on education is to let the states articulate what is working and support the states in these endeavors. He strongly believes parents should be empowered with the choice to send their children to the school that can best educate them. He promises to pursue reforms in the education system of the country such that it becomes accountable and responsible for producing well-educated children in the country.

Barack Obama believes that the federal government has a much larger role to play then simply supporting the programs taken up by the states. He takes a more comprehensive and pro-active approach to address not only primary and secondary but lifelong learnings.

On the 'No child left behind' program, McCain would consider changing the testing requirements for some students while Barack Obama would offer more support to schools that need help.

McCain supports tying remuneration of teachers with the improvement of children's test scores. While Obama supports remuneration based on individual teacher performance.

Obama vs. McCain in opinion polls

A day before the election, NPR reported that The final Pew Research Center poll of the 2008 presidential election gives Barack Obama a 49 to 42 percent lead over his rival, John McCain. Though still a significant lead, it's suddenly a much tighter race than Obama's 15-point lead from last week.

A record of opinion polls over time can be found on the BBC website at http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/in_depth/629/629/7360265.stm

Barack Obama initially had a consistent lead in opinion polls. The McCain campaign slowly chipped away at this lead until they were within 5 percentage points of each other before the Democratic and Republican conventions. After the conventions, however, the gap narrowed and John McCain even came out ahead in some of the polls.

Results of John McCain vs. Barack Obama Opinion Polls: Wikipedia

In the Reuters/CSPAN poll among "likely" voters administered Oct 11-15 2008, Obama leads McCain 48% to 44%. In the CBS News/New York Times poll administered Oct 10-13, Obama leads McCain by 14 points (53% to 39%).

McCain vs. Obama in prediction markets

On Sunday night (November 2, 2008), two days before the election, Obama leads McCain 89% to 11% in the prediction markets on Intrade.net. Their respective charts can be seen at

On September 17, 2008, McCain and Obama were running neck and neck on the prediction markets on Intrade.net, with Obama at 50% and McCain at 49.2%.

John McCain vs. Barack Obama Presidential Debates

2008 Presidential Debates Schedule

Although the nominees of the Republican and Democratic parties and any permitted third-party candidates must agree to the final schedule and formats, the following is the schedule announced by the CPD on November 19, 2007.

Obama vs. McCain - First Debate

The first presidential debate between Barack Obama and John McCain was held on September 26, 2008 at the University of Mississippi's Gertrude C. Ford Center in Oxford, Mississippi. The debate was moderated by Jim Lehrer, executive editor and anchor of The NewsHour on PBS. The focus of the debate was supposed to be foreign policy and national security. However, the first 40 minutes of the debate were about the financial crisis, since financial stability is one of the cornerstones of national security.

The video of the first presidential debate - McCain vs. Obama 2008:

A few days before the debate, John McCain said that he would suspend his campaign in view of the crisis on Wall Street and the government's efforts to structure a bailout plan. He was criticized by some observers, including David Letterman on whose show John McCain was scheduled to be a guest but later canceled because of suspending his campaign. Mr. Obama also criticized Mr. McCain, saying "..that this is exactly the time when the American people need to hear from the person who, in approximately 40 days, will be responsible for dealing with this mess." McCain said that his first responsibility was to attend to his job as senator to help with the crisis.  Ultimately, Obama said that they could call him if they needed him.  The debate went on as planned.

Obama - McCain Second Debate

The second presidential debate was held on Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 8 p.m. CDT at Belmont University's Curb Event Center in Nashville, Tennessee. The debate was moderated by Tom Brokaw, special correspondent (and former evening news anchor) for NBC News. This debate had a town-hall meeting format.

The video of the second presidential debate - McCain vs Obama 2008:

The debate came at a time of great economic turmoil. The stock market had plunged on the day of the debate and in the weeks and month before the debate. According to the International Herald Tribune article covering the debate,
The gravity of the moment and the somber setting — a town-hall-style meeting in front of 80 selected voters who, when not asking questions, watched in silence, not applauding or laughing — produced an often stifled encounter, largely absent of dramatic confrontations or the personal exchanges that dominated the campaign over the past several days. There was no indication that the debate did anything to change the course of a campaign that appeared to be moving in Obama's direction.

Obama - McCain Third Debate

The third presidential debate was held on Wednesday, October 15, 2008, 9 p.m. EDT at Hofstra University's Hofstra Arena in Hempstead, New York. The debate was moderated by Bob Schieffer, CBS News chief Washington correspondent and host of Face the Nation. The focus of the debate was on domestic and economic policy.

The third debate between Obama and McCain was the most combative of the three debates. Candidates were asked questions on negative ads and personal attacks, their position on abortion and Roe v Wade, judicial appointments, their vice presidential picks, climate change, energy policy, healthcare policy and economic policy. The debate was held on a day when the Dow Jones Industrial Average had one of its worst days in history, falling 733 points or 7.87% on a single day.

According to the New York Times, Senator John McCain used the final debate of the presidential election on Wednesday night to raise persistent and pointed questions about Senator Barack Obama’s character, judgment and policy prescriptions in a session that was by far the most spirited and combative of their encounters this fall.
At times showing anger and at others a methodical determination to make all his points, Mr. McCain pressed his Democratic rival on taxes, spending, the tone of the campaign and his association with the former Weather Underground leader William Ayers, using nearly every argument at his disposal in an effort to alter the course of a contest that has increasingly gone Mr. Obama’s way.
But Mr. Obama maintained a placid and at times bemused demeanor — if at times appearing to work at it — as he parried the attacks and pressed his consistent line that Mr. McCain would represent a continuation of President Bush’s unpopular policies, especially on the economy.

Obama vs. McCain - Third Debate - Full video

Joe the Plumber

A distinguishing feature of the debate was that repeated references were made to Joe Wurzelbacher, aka "Joe the Plumber". Wurzelbacher had earlier confronted Obama at a rally in Toledo, Ohio where Wurzelbacher complained that Obama's tax policy would make it difficult for him to maintain his prosperity if he bought the business that he had been employed at as a plumber. McCain brought up "Joe the Plumber" and Obama and McCain then made statements aimed directly at Wurzelbacher. These events led to subsequent media attention directed at Wurzelbacher

Obama vs McCain 2008 Presidential Election Results

The results will be updated in this section as they are announced. The map can also be seen on the New York Times website.

Summary of 2008 Presidential Election Results

StateElectoral VotesResult
Alabama9 John McCain
Alaska3 John McCain
Arizona10 John McCain
Arkansas6 John McCain
California55 Barack Obama
Colorado9 Barack Obama
Connecticut7 Barack Obama
Delaware3 Barack Obama
Washington, D.C.3 Barack Obama
Florida27 Barack Obama
Georgia15 John McCain
Hawaii4 Barack Obama
Idaho4 John McCain
Illinois21 Barack Obama
Indiana11 Barack Obama
Iowa7 Barack Obama
Kansas6 John McCain
Kentucky8 John McCain
Louisiana9 John McCain
Maine4 Barack Obama
Maryland10 Barack Obama
Massachusetts12 Barack Obama
Michigan17 Barack Obama
Minnesota10 Barack Obama
Mississippi6 John McCain
Missouri11 John McCain
Montana3 John McCain
Nebraska5 John McCain
Nevada5 Barack Obama
New Hampshire4 Barack Obama
New Jersey15 Barack Obama
New Mexico5 Barack Obama
New York31 Barack Obama
North Carolina15 Barack Obama
North Dakota3 John McCain
Ohio20 Barack Obama
Oklahoma7 John McCain
Oregon7 Barack Obama
Pennsylvania21 Barack Obama
Rhode Island4 Barack Obama
South Carolina8 John McCain
South Dakota3 John McCain
Tennessee11 John McCain
Texas34 John McCain
Utah5 John McCain
Vermont3 Barack Obama
Virginia13 Barack Obama
Washington11 Barack Obama
West Virginia5 John McCain
Wisconsin10 Barack Obama
Wyoming3 John McCain

Election Results in Blue states

Election Results in Washington state
Washington state has 11 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Washington for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that the state was leaning towards Obama, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Oregon
Oregon has 7 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Oregon for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that Barack Obama had a solid lead over John McCain in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in California
California has 55 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called California for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that Barack Obama had a solid lead over John McCain in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Nevada
Nevada has 5 electoral votes. The results for the 2008 Presidential election will be updated in this section after they are declared. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that the state was leaning towards Obama, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Colorado
Colorado has 9 electoral votes. The results for the 2008 Presidential election will be updated in this section after they are declared. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that the state was leaning towards Obama, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in New Mexico
New Mexico has 5 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called New Mexico for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that the state was leaning towards Obama, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Minnesota
Minnesota has 10 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Minnesota for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that the state was leaning towards Obama, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Iowa
Iowa has 7 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Iowa for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that the state was leaning towards Obama, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Wisconsin
Wisconsin has 10 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Wisconsin for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that the state was leaning towards Obama, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Illinois
Illinois has 21 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Illinois for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that Barack Obama had a solid lead over John McCain in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Michigan
Michigan has 17 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Michigan for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that Barack Obama had a solid lead over John McCain in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in New York
New York has 31 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called New York for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that Barack Obama had a solid lead over John McCain in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania has 21 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Pennsylvania for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that the state was leaning towards Obama, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Virginia
Virginia has 13 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Virginia for Barack Obama in a close race 1,540,592 (51%) to 1,482,395 (49%) with 92% of precincts reporting. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that the state was leaning towards Obama, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C. has 3 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Washington, D.C. for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that Barack Obama had a solid lead over John McCain in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Connecticut
Connecticut has 7 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Minnesota for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that Barack Obama had a solid lead over John McCain in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Massachusetts
Massachusetts has 12 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Minnesota for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that Barack Obama had a solid lead over John McCain in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Vermont
Vermont has 3 electoral votes. By 7PM Eastern time, CNN called Vermont for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that Barack Obama had a solid lead over John McCain in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in New Hampshire
New Hampshire has 4 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Minnesota for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that the state was leaning towards Obama, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Rhode Island
Rhode Island has 4 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Minnesota for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that Barack Obama had a solid lead over John McCain in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Hawaii
Hawaii has 4 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Hawaii for Barack Obama. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that Barack Obama had a solid lead over John McCain in the state, according to the The New York Times.

Detailed Election Results in Red states

Election Results in Idaho
Idaho has 4 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Idaho for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Utah
Utah has 5 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Utah for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Arizona
Arizona has 10 electoral votes. The results for the 2008 Presidential election will be updated in this section after they are declared. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Montana
Montana has 3 electoral votes. The results for the 2008 Presidential election will be updated in this section after they are declared. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that the state was leaning towards McCain, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Wyoming
Wyoming has 3 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Wyoming for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in North Dakota
North Dakota has 3 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called North Dakota for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that the state was leaning towards McCain, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in South Dakota
South Dakota has 3 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called South Dakota for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Nebraska
Nebraska has 5 electoral votes. The results for the 2008 Presidential election will be updated in this section after they are declared. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Kansas
Kansas has 6 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Kansas for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Oklahoma
Oklahoma has 7 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Oklahoma for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Texas
Texas has 34 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Texas for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Arkansas
Arkansas has 6 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Arkansas for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Louisiana
Louisiana has 9 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Louisiana for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Kentucky
Kentucky has 8 electoral votes. On November 4, CNN called Kentucky for Senator McCain by 7PM Eastern. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Tennessee
Tennessee has 11 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Tennessee for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Mississippi
Mississippi has 6 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Tennessee for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Alabama
Alabama has 9 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Alabama for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Georgia
Georgia has 15 electoral votes. CNN has called Georgia for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that the state was leaning towards McCain, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in South Carolina
South Carolina has 8 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called South Carolina for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in West Virginia
West Virginia has 5 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called West Virginia for John McCain. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that the state was leaning towards McCain, according to the The New York Times.
Election Results in Alaska
Alaska has 3 electoral votes. The results for the 2008 Presidential election will be updated in this section after they are declared. The day before the election, opinion polls suggested that McCain had a solid lead over Obama in the state, according to the The New York Times.

Election Results in swing states

Election Results in Ohio
Ohio has 20 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Ohio for Barack Obama.
Election Results in Indiana
Indiana has 11 electoral votes. The results for the 2008 Presidential election will be updated in this section after they are declared. In 2004, George Bush handily beat John Kerry in Indiana. However, in 2008 polls predicted that the race will be close.
Election Results in Missouri
Missouri has 11 electoral votes. The results for the 2008 Presidential election will be updated in this section after they are declared.
Election Results in North Carolina
North Carolina has 15 electoral votes. The results for the 2008 Presidential election will be updated in this section after they are declared.
Election Results in Florida
Florida has 27 electoral votes. The Associated Press has called Florida for Barack Obama.

References

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"Barack Obama vs John McCain." Diffen.com. Diffen LLC, n.d. Web. 7 Dec 2018. < >